What It’s Like Living In The Coldest Place On Earth Still Inhabited By Humans

Welp, we can’t live in Antarctica, but if you really want to live in the coldest place on earth, Oymyakon, Russia is just the place for you.

Just how cold is cold? -38 °F in November and it’s not even technically winter yet.

These stunning photos were taken by journalist and photographer Amos Chapple giving his audience a glimpse into the coldest place on earth.

In late September, temperatures drop as low as 32 °F, but can dip as low as -58 °F.

This woman walks across a frozen bridge in Yakutsk. Omyakon is located two days of driving outside the regional capital, Yakutsk


This is actually a bathroom on the side of the road.

The only months that the temperature does not fall below 14°F are June and July
The coldest temperature ever recorded in Omyakon was on February 6, 1933 when the thermostat read an incredible -90 degrees Fahrenheit °F


Oymakon is largely fueled by the village heating plant, which constantly releases streaks of coal smoke into the air. You can see the smoke billowing during a traditionally quiet dawn


Interestingly, the city gets its name from the nearby Oymyakon River. The river’s name is said to be based on the word kheim, meaning ‘unfrozen patch of water; place where fish spend the winter’


The village only has one shop that sales practically everything the rural community needs


Amos Chapple says it was very challenging to photograph the village life here, simply because the locals are so hard to find!


Ivan Kraft was the first governor of Yakutia, his statue sits in the city, frozen over most of the year
Local farmer, Nikolai Petrovich keeps his cows warm and cozy each night by tucking them away in this heavily-insulated barn
A local woman strolls across the street with a mitten pressed over her face, it was -63F on this day back in 2013


Right at city center, a house sits frosted over in ice and snow
A local woman shops for food at the outdoor market


This digger delivers coal to the heating plant each morning in order to keep the town residents from freezing over


You can check out more Chapple over at his website here, and you can also see more over at his Facebook page.

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For more stories, subscribe to our free e-mail list. (h/t Earth Porm) (Photo credits: Amos Chapple)